As a species, we are designed to be discontented with our situation. It's this constant feeling of wanting more that is responsible for most of the advancements we've made. We feel like we don't have enough money, enough things and enough recognition. Our professional lives are no different. As cubicle dwellers, a lot of us constantly daydream about greener pastures, a more comfortable life and the promise of more wealth. For most people, the answer to achieving this is creating a startup of their own.

But how feasible are startups really? Before you make the leap from your current corporate position to the promised land of entrepreneurship, let's take a look at a few things you should consider.

1. You might have an idea, not a business plan 

Great ideas are absolutely necessary for a successful company, but so are sound business plans. If you've been working at a desk for all your life, you may not be aware what it takes to run a business. That great social network idea you have might crumble once you understand the nitty-gritty of hiring a team, looking for funding and building a revenue model.  

2. Startups aren't a magic money pill

When you actually get started with your own business, you might be surprised how long it takes to turn a profit. If you're building an online business, you might turn a profit quicker than a brick-and-mortar operation, but it will still take you a couple of years on average before you're making as much as you do at your current job.

3. Startups have their own set of challenges

If you're frustrated with the bureaucracy at your current organization, you might be in for a rude awakening once you're at a startup. Startup founders don't have insurance, paid vacations and well-stocked canteens. Make sure you're jumping ship to a startup because you're really passionate about building your own company, not just because you're tired of your supervisor.

4. Startups live or die by the performance of the business

At your current day job, individual performance can help you rise through the ranks rapidly, even if the company as a whole isn't doing so well. At a startup, even if you're an excellent performer, you will fail if the customer rejects your product.

5. You may not be prepared for the stress of running a startup

When you're running your own business, you are the boss. There's no safety net in place to cushion you if you make unsavory decisions. Additionally, if you're not used to being in a leadership role, being the boss can bring out some undesirable qualities in your personality.

6. Your startup isn't just a job; it's your life

Raise your hand if you've been thinking you'll have pretty much the same work environment at your startup, except here you'll be working for yourself instead of someone else. Running your own business is nothing like a job. It takes constant, 24-7 commitment and persistence. Your startup needs to be a part of who you are, or you won't be able to make the sacrifices necessary to make it succeed.

If you've been dreaming about starting your own company, you'd be well advised to think long and hard about what that would mean. Startups are a labor of love. If you're going to start your business as some misguided act of defiance, you're in for some hard times. On the other hand, if you've considered all of the pros and cons of quitting your current cushy job for the entrepreneurial dream, more power to you. As a species, we are designed to be discontented with our situation. It's this constant feeling of wanting more that is responsible for most of the advancements we've made. We feel like we don't have enough money, enough things and enough recognition. Our professional lives are no different. As cubicle dwellers, a lot of us constantly daydream about greener pastures, a more comfortable life and the promise of more wealth. For most people, the answer to achieving this is creating a startup of their own.

But how feasible are startups really? Before you make the leap from your current corporate position to the promised land of entrepreneurship, let's take a look at a few things you should consider.

1. You might have an idea, not a business plan

Great ideas are absolutely necessary for a successful company, but so are sound business plans. If you've been working at a desk for all your life, you may not be aware what it takes to run a business. That great social network idea you have might crumble once you understand the nitty-gritty of hiring a team, looking for funding and building a revenue model.

2. Startups aren't a magic money pill

When you actually get started with your own business, you might be surprised how long it takes to turn a profit. If you're building an online business, you might turn a profit quicker than a brick-and-mortar operation, but it will still take you a couple of years on average before you're making as much as you do at your current job.

3. Startups have their own set of challenges

If you're frustrated with the bureaucracy at your current organization, you might be in for a rude awakening once you're at a startup. Startup founders don't have insurance, paid vacations and well-stocked canteens. Make sure you're jumping ship to a startup because you're really passionate about building your own company, not just because you're tired of your supervisor.

4. Startups live or die by the performance of the business

At your current day job, individual performance can help you rise through the ranks rapidly, even if the company as a whole isn't doing so well. At a startup, even if you're an excellent performer, you will fail if the customer rejects your product.

5. You may not be prepared for the stress of running a startup

When you're running your own business, you are the boss. There's no safety net in place to cushion you if you make unsavory decisions. Additionally, if you're not used to being in a leadership role, being the boss can bring out some undesirable qualities in your personality

6. Your startup isn't just a job; it's your life

Raise your hand if you've been thinking you'll have pretty much the same work environment at your startup, except here you'll be working for yourself instead of someone else. Running your own business is nothing like a job. It takes constant, 24-7 commitment and persistence. Your startup needs to be a part of who you are, or you won't be able to make the sacrifices necessary to make it succeed.

If you've been dreaming about starting your own company, you'd be well advised to think long and hard about what that would mean. Startups are a labor of love. If you're going to start your business as some misguided act of defiance, you're in for some hard times. On the other hand, if you've considered all of the pros and cons of quitting your current cushy job for the entrepreneurial life and still want to pursue it, more power to you.